Faculty of Medicine in the Media: April 2018

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Here is a highlight of where our faculty members, learners and alumni have appeared in the news this month.

Week of April 22 - 30

Dr. Vera Etches is Ottawa's first female officer of health (CBC News)
Dr. Vera Etches, Adjunct Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, has been named the city's new medical officer of health.

Bicycle-driven simulator helps LTC patients (Canadian Healthcare Technology)
Bruyère Research Institute, a partner of the University of Ottawa, has acquired a Norwegian technology to promote exercise for older adults.

Recommending e-cigarettes to help smokers quit is irresponsible 'because they ENCOURAGE smoking and are linked to bronchitis and stillbirths' (Brief Report)
Dr. Kenneth Johnson, Adjunct Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, argues against recommending e-cigarettes for smokers to help quit smoking.

Over 35? Yes, you can still have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby (Global News)
Dr. Laura Gaudet, Faculty of Medicine, discusses the risks of pregnancy after 35.

7 Health Benefits of Taking Your Lunch Break (Best Health)
Dr. Andrew Pipe, Faculty of Medicine, talks about the benefits of taking a lunch break.

Health & Sex Are fitness apps dangerous? (Times LIVE)
Blog by Dr. Sarah Giles, Voluntary clinical lecturer at the Faculty of Medicine, on fitness apps.

NOSM engages expert panel (Fort Frances Times)
Dr. Jerry Maniate, Faculty of Medicine, will participate in an expert panel to examine, report on, and make recommendations about the relationships, structures, and policies that exist between the school and indigenous peoples.

Week of April 15 - 21

I'm A Fitness App Addict, But I Know They Sabotage My Workouts (HuffPost Canada)
Blog by Dr. Sarah Giles, Voluntary clinical lecturer at the Faculty of Medicine, on fitness apps.

More than one in 100 Nunavut infants have TB (iPolitics)
Opinion piece by Dr. Sarah Giles, Voluntary clinical lecturer at the Faculty of Medicine, about Canada’s simmering tuberculosis (TB) outbreak in northern communities.

Smartphone app outperforms traditional exam in cardiac assessment (HealthManagement.org)
Dr. Benjamin Hibbert, Assistant Professor in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, comments on the use of a smartphone to monitor changes in colour in the fingertips to measure circulation.

Week of April 08 - 14

Philip Cross: Elites bungled their carbon-tax crusade because they don't understand Canadians (Financial Post)
This article mentions Dr. Michael Wolfson's, Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, resistance to tax reform in response to the overhaul of small-business taxes proposed by Finance Minister Bill Morneau.

Caring for a Woman's Heart (TVO)
Dr. Thais Coutinho, Assistant Professor of Medicine, discusses the deadly consequences of the gap in women's cardiac health care.

Today Show segment on 'nerve freezing' for weight loss leaves us cold. Here's why. (Health News Review)
Dr. Yoni Freedhoff, Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine, outlines possible explanations for why a woman lost weight after undergoing an experimental procedure to "freeze" a nerve which carries signals between the gut and brain including feelings of hunger.

If U.S. gets its way, NAFTA will make us fat (Winnipeg Free Press)
Opinion Editorial by Dr. Ronald Labonté, Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, on how a new NAFTA deal could make obesity rates worse than in the U.S.

Ramin: Running and so much Moor — Trip to terrain of Sherlock Holmes fame a chance to bond with kindred spirits (Ottawa Citizen)
Opinion Editorial from Dr. Brodie Ramin, Faculty of Medicine, on his trip to the terrain of Sherlock Holmes.

Canadian doctor champions palliative care for terminally ill Rohingya refugees (RCI)
Dr. Megan Doherty, Department of Pediatrics, talks about her experience visiting refugee camps in Bangladesh as part of a research project into palliative care needs in the camps.

Week of April 01 - 07

Can trade agreements be fattening? The hidden calorie cost of free trade (CBC News)
Dr. Ronald Labonté, Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, comments on a  new analysis reveals that Canadians had access to about 170 extra calories per day after the first Canada-U.S. free trade agreement.

Healthy Eating Begins In A Home Kitchen (Ottawa Citizen)
Dr. Yoni Freedhoff, Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine, discusses the importance of a home-cooked meal.

A SpaceX Dragon Is About to Launch Tons of Science (and Bring a Robot Home) - Space.com (Google News)
This article mentions the Marrow study led by Dr. Guy Trudel, Professor in the Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology at the Faculty of Medicine.

Everyday Hero: Ottawa doctor becomes Canada's first Inuk heart surgeon (Global News)
This article highlights the story of Dr. Donna May Kimmaliardjuk, a fourth-year cardiac surgery resident at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute and Canada’s first Inuk heart surgeon.

Smartphone app helps doctors more accurately measure blood flow: study (Global News)
Dr. Benjamin Hibbert, Assistant Professor in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine , comments on the use of a smartphone to monitor changes in colour in the fingertips to measure circulation.

Can Changing What Foods You Eat Improve Your Mental Health? (Chatelaine)
Dr. Ian Colman, Associate Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, explains that there’s a strong body of evidence showing an association between diet and mental health, but it is very complex.

New heart institute expansion ready for patients (Ottawa Citizen)
Fifteen patients from the heart institute’s intensive care unit were carefully moved to the new state-of-the-art critical care facility.

How a New NAFTA Deal Will Make Us Fat (The Tyee)
Dr. Ronald Labonté, Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, shares his thoughts on how a new NAFTA deal will make us fat.


French Media

Semaine de 22 - 30 avril

Des succès dignes de mention (Le Droit)
L'article mentionne qu'environ 300 chirurgies cardiaques (opération à cœur ouvert) sont pratiquées à l’Institut de cardiologie de l’université d’Ottawa.

Semaine du 15 – 21 avril

Santé cardiaque: un enjeu que les femmes prennent à coeur (L'Express CA)
Dre Michèle de Margerie de l'Institut de cardiologie de l'Université Ottawa, discute de la santé cardiaque des femmes.

Semaine du 1 – 7 avril

Financement de projets de recherche: Coca-Cola ne dit pas tout (La Presse)
Dr Jean-Philippe Chaput, Professeur agrégé et Dr Mark Tremblay, Professeur, tous deux à l’école d’épidémiologie et de santé publique tous les deux de la Faculté de médecine sont sur la liste qui dénonce les institutions et les individus ayant reçu le plus d'argent de Coca-Cola.

 

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