Faculty of Medicine in the Media: January 2018

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Here is a highlight of where our faculty members, learners and alumni have appeared in the news this month.

Week of January 22 – 31

Ottawa researchers to study new approach to liver surgery and blood transfusions (Ottawa Citizen)
Dr. Guillaume Martel, Associate Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, and his team have been awarded nearly half a million dollars from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to study a technique that involves removing about 10 per cent of a patient’s blood prior to liver surgery and replacing it after surgery.

Postcolonoscopy cancer rates persist despite quality protocols (PM 360)
Dr. Sanjay K. Murthy, Faculty of Medicine, explains that "it is believed that the majority of PCCRCs [postcolonoscopy colorectal cancers] arise due to cancers or near cancers that were either missed or incompletely treated during colonoscopy".

Smoking Just One Cigarette A Day Can Seriously Damage Your Health (HuffPost UK)
Dr. Kenneth Johnson, Adjunct Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, outlines the major public health implications regarding cigarette smoking.

20 Things Your Skin Says About Your Health (Best Health)
Dr. Jillian Macdonald, Department of Medicine, explains that while problematic skin could simply mean that you need to alter your beauty routine, your skin’s condition could also be the tell-tale sign of an underlying medical condition.

Infectious diseases expert Dr. Virginia Roth is The Ottawa Hospital's new chief of staff (Ottawa Citizen)
This article features Dr. Virginia Roth, who trained in internal medicine and infectious diseases at the University of Ottawa, for being appointed new chief of staff at The Ottawa Hospital.

Scanlan: A fitness trainer's call to take the work out of the workout  (Ottawa Citizen)
Dr. Mark Tremblay, Professor at the Faculty of Medicine, remarked last year on a study that showed millennial children, aged 12, were "taller, heavier, weaker, rounder, less flexible and less aerobically fit" than a generation ago.

Internet Addiction Is Linked to Adolescent Angst (Pacific Standard)
Hugues Sampasa-Kanyinga, Faculty of Medicine, led a research team that found that nearly two-thirds of respondents failed to get the recommended amount of sleep for their age group.

Reconstructing bodies, rebuilding lives (Tabaret)

Dr. Siba Haykal, Faculty of Medicine Alumna, works to reconstruct bodies and rebuild lives.

Week of January 15 - 21 

Getting Your Period At A Young Age Could Put You At Risk Of Heart Disease (HuffPost Canada) 
Dr. Amanda Black, Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology discusses a new research linking early menstruation to cardiovascular problems.

Week of January 08 - 14

Friday Feedback: Does Intermittent Fasting Have Merit? (MedPage Today)
Dr. Yoni Freedhoff, Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine shares his opinion on dieting and intermittent fasting.

Everyday Heroes of 2017: A Global News Special (Global News)
Dr. Antoine Hakim, Professor in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine and Andrew Pelling, Faculty of Science are both featured in this Global News Special for their remarks.

Cannabis Skincare: Here's the buzz on this budding beauty segment (MSN)
Dr. Mark Kirchhof, Professor in the Department of Medicine, talks about the potential to tackle common skin issues with the use of cannabis.

A small breakthrough for brain cancer, a new outlook for a patient (Ottawa Citizen)
Dr. Garth Nicholas, Assistant Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine, comments on a device called Optune, which creates an electric field and disrupts cell division - it is believed to disproportionately result in the death of cancer cells, slowing the progress of the brain cancer.

Michael Wolfson: Is it time for major tax reform in Canada? (Vancouver Province)
Dr. Michael Wolfson, Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, shares his thoughts on major tax reform in Canada.

University of Ottawa Heart Institute's 'Dr. K' is Canada's first Inuk cardiac surgeon (Ottawa Citizen)
Dr. Donna May Kimmaliardjuk, a fourth-year cardiac surgery resident at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute and Canada's first Inuk heart surgeon, was recently recognized with an Indspire Award for being a role model for young women and Indigenous youth.

Week of January 01 - 07

Dr. Jocko a role model (Sudbury Star)
This article highlights Dr. Jennifer Jocko, who completed her obstetrics and gynecology specialty training at the University of Ottawa, for being named a Healthy Change Champion by the North East Local Health Integration Network for her commitment to women's health and patient-centred care.

How researchers and institutions can help stop the spread of fake science (CTV News The LINK Online, Jan. 7, 2018 (RCI)
Dr. John Bell, Professor in the Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, is featured for his study which found that combining two immunotherapies could prove effective in stopping the spread of cancer.

Heart institute's surgeons among world's real heroes (Ottawa Citizen)
Dr. Marc Ruel, Professor in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, talks about heart surgery and the University of Ottawa Heart Institute.


French Media

Semaine du 15 – 21 janvier

Lutte au Tabac: les experts réunis à Ottawa (Le Droit)
Dr Andrew Pipe et Marie-Lyne Do Couto, l'Institut de cardiologie de l'Université d'Ottawa, et d'autres experts se sont réunis pour la Conférence sur l'abandon du tabac à Ottawa.

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