Faculty of Medicine in the Media: July 2017

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Here is a highlight of where our faculty members, learners and alumni have appeared in the news this month.

Week of July 15-21

Inside the big revamp of Canada's Food Guide (The Globe and Mail)
Dr. Yoni Freedhoff, Assistant Professor of Family Medicine, explains that one of the most common criticisms leveled against the Canadian food guide is that it simply prescribes too much food and too many calories for a healthy daily diet.

Ottawa moves to end tax loophole favoured by rich professionals (National Post)
An estimate by Dr. Michael Wolfson, Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, suggests that the federal government would collect $500 million more annually by restricting the ability of incorporated professionals to split income and lower tax bills by paying spouses and adult children.

Canada must do more to protect women (Toronto Star)
Corinne Packer, Faculty of Medicine, explains that Canada is “behind the ball” in addressing female genital mutilation.

Female Genital Mutilation is illegal here, but thousands of Canadian girls are at risk (Toronto Star)
Corinne Packer, Faculty of Medicine, explains that while some progress is being made to prevent female genital mutilation in Canada, the country's efforts fall short of what other countries are actively doing.

Study linking NAFTA to obesity reminder to read fine print (CBC News)
Dr. Ronald Labonté, Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, notes there's enough evidence to suggest that high-fructose corn syrup was a contributor to rising obesity rates in the late '80s and early '90s.

3 Metabolism Myths That Need To Die Immediately (Stack TV)
Dr. Yoni Freedhoff, Assistant Professor of Family Medicine, explains that skinny individuals almost invariably have slower resting metabolisms, as “there is literally less of them to burn while at rest.”

Eating sweetened dishes while profound raises risk of asthma (Health Medicine Network)
Dr. Shawn Aaron, Division of Respirology, notes that while doctors wouldn't diagnose diabetes without checking blood sugar levels, “for some reason many doctors are not ordering the spirometry tests that can definitely diagnose asthma."

Documenting women's lives during the Holocaust (TVO)
Dr. Beverley Chalmers, Professor in the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, discusses her book, 'Birth, Sex and Abuse: Women's Voices Under Nazi Rule.

Week of July 8-14

Dementia and Memory Loss (Healthscape)

The University of Ottawa Brain and Mind Research Institute (uOBMRI) and Bruyère Research Institute (BRI) recently launched Ottawa's first-ever joint fundraising campaign for improved memory and dementia research, education and care with the aim to collectively raise $20 million over the next three years.

SECOND OPINION Did Canadians get a caloric kick from NAFTA? (CBC News)
Dr. Ronald Labonté, Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, wrote a commentary accompanying a new study in the CMAJ: "There's a very strong indication that NAFTA was probably a factor in increasing the kilocalorie sugar intake of Canadians particularly in relationship to the increased supply of high-fructose corn syrup."

The Ottawa sanatorium puncture medicine study (Health Medicine Network)
Dr. Alan Forster, Scientific Director, Clinical Quality and Performance Management and Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health and Dr. Daniel McIsaac, Anesthesiologist and Assistant Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, conducted a study which found that delays for emergency surgery are associated with a higher risk of death for patients in hospitals.

US company launches a new blacklist of deceptive academic journals (Medical Health News)
Dr. David Moher, Associate Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, comments on the launch by Cabells International, a U.S.-based publishing-services company, of a blacklist of what it calls “deceptive” scholarly journals.  

Meet Dr. Andrew Boozary, the St. Mike's 'superstar' who's taking on Big Pharma (Toronto Star)
Dr. Jeffrey Turnbull, Full professor at the Faculty of Medicine, comments on work by Dr. Andrew Boozary, uOttawa alumnus, who helped found and lead Open Pharma, which is pushing to make financial ties between the medical profession and pharmaceutical companies in this country more transparent.

Finalists for the 2017 Workforce Optimas Awards Announced (Workforce)
The Faculty of Medicine is listed among finalists of the 2017 Workforce Optimas Awards, joining “an elite group of past winners that is reshaping people management strategies around the globe.”

How free trade can make you fat (Washington Post)
Ashley Schram, PhD student, and Dr. Ronald Labonté, Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, argue that a study which found that NAFTA may have boosted consumption of high-fructose corn syrup in Canada should give trade negotiators pause as they work on future agreements.

Don't eat sugary foods while pregnant! (Daily Mail)
Dr. Shawn Aaron, Division of Respirology, notes that while doctors wouldn't diagnose diabetes without checking blood sugar levels, “for some reason many doctors are not ordering the spirometry tests that can definitely diagnose asthma."

Delays in emergency surgery linked to higher risk of death (UPI)
A team of researchers at the University of Ottawa and The Ottawa Hospital, including Dr. Alan Forster, Scientific Director, Clinical Quality and Performance Management and Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, found delays in emergency surgery were linked to a higher risk of death for patients.

Prompt emergency surgeries saves lives and money: Ottawa Hospital study (Ottawa Community News)
Dr. Alan Forster, Scientific Director, Clinical Quality and Performance Management and Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, and his team found that emergency surgery delays are associated with an increased risk of dying and longer recovery times for patients.

Crowd gets into it - really gets into it - at Choir! Choir! Choir! Bluesfest show  (Ottawa Citizen)
Rick Perrier, student at the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Medicine, says he wanted to attend the Choir! Choir! Choir! event because he loves music.


Week of July 1- 7

Dalhousie medical school launches opioid prescribing courses (Canadian Healthcare Network)
Dr. Peter MacDougall from the department of the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, plans to introduce a course aimed at training physicians to effectively and safely prescribe opioids at the University of Ottawa.

KDH one of the first to attain silver status in Healthy Foods in Champlain Hospitals initiative (Inside Ottawa Valley)
Dr. Andrew Pipe, Professor at the Faculty of Medicine, comments on the “silver status” awarded to Kemptville District Hospital (KDH) by the Healthy Foods in Champlain Hospitals initiative, which aims to create a healthy food environment in hospitals within the Champlain Local Health Integration Network (LHIN).

Can Sleeping In Decrease Your Waist Size? (Mercola)
Dr. Jean-Philippe Chaput, Junior Research Chair and Assistant Professor, comments: "Short sleepers tend to eat more meals per day, snack more, engage in more screen time and may be less likely to move due to increased sensations of fatigue when not rested."

3D printing set to revolutionize medicine (CMAJ News)
Dr. Adnan Sheikh, Associate Professor of Radiology, discusses 3D printing used to replicate tumours and for other surgical applications.

Consumption of high-fructose corn syrup increased in Canada after tariffs lowered in NAFTA (Medical Xpress)
Dr. Ronald Labonté, Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, comments on recent research findings linking NAFTA to an increased consumption of high-fructose corn syrup in Canada.

No Good Predictor of Sleep Disordered Breathing in Down Syndrome Children (Medscape)
Dr. Sherri Lynne Katz, Associate Professor and Pediatric Respirologist, notes in Sleep Medicine (online) that about 50% of children with Down syndrome have sleep disordered breathing, versus only 1% to 5% in the general population.

Tasting Across Time and Terroir: The 9 Bordeaux Wine Appellations of Dourthe (Wine News)
Dr. Simon Chen, Assistant Professor, Canada Research Chair in Neural Circuits and Behavior at the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, comments on his wine tasting experience: "It was my first time attending Natalie’s team wine tasting at the Andaz Hotel, and it was simply amazing [...]"

Nature on the move (The Globe and Mail)
Dr. Manisha Kulkarni, Assistant Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, outlines health risks associated with mosquitoes and the best defences to limit risks.

Deprescribing PPIs: An Algorithm (Medscape)
Dr. Barbara Farrell, Clinical Investigator, Department of Family Medicine, highlights the inappropriate prescribing of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs): "It's as though almost every patient who comes through your door is on a PPI…"


French Media

Semaine du 1-7 Juillet

Nos enfants ciblés par la publicité (Le Soleil)
Dr Monique Potvin Kent, département d’épidémiologie et santé publique, fait le point sur la quantité de publicité que voient les jeunes sur des aliments et boissons à faible valeur nutritive.

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