Vascular development may be at risk in autism

Posted on Monday, July 13, 2020

A Canadian collaboration led by Dr. Baptiste Lacoste has undertaken the first ever in-depth study of vasculature in the autistic brain. The product of four years of work, a paper published today in Nature Neuroscience lays out several lines of novel evidence that strongly implicate defects in endothelial cells—the lining of blood vessels—in autism.

Dr. Lacoste, a scientist at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and an assistant professor in the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Medicine and Brain and Mind Research institute, heads a lab that specializes in neurovascular interactions in health and disease. In collaboration with researchers at McGill University, Laval University, and the National Research Council of Canada, Dr. Lacoste’s team used a mouse model with one of the most common genetic mutations found in autism spectrum disorder—16p11.2 deletion, or “16p” for short.

To view full article please click here.

Back to top