David Lohnes

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David Lohnes
Professor | Chair, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine | Director, Transgenic Core Facility

BSc Biochemistry (Honours), Queen's University
PhD Biochemistry (Dr. Glen Jones), Queen's University
Postdoctoral Fellow, CNRS/LGME Strasbourg, France

Room: RGN 3510C
Office: (613) 562-5800 ext. 8684
Work E-mail: dlohnes@uottawa.ca

Dr. David Lohnes

Biography

The Transgenic Core is currently recruiting a Transgenic Research Technician. Interested applicants, send your CV to Dr. David Lohnes (dlohnes@uottawa.ca).

Overview of Interests

Dr. Lohnes’ work focuses on two broad themes: (i) improving our understanding of the genetic networks underlying early development of the mammalian embryo and (ii) pathways and transcriptional networks impacting intestinal development and homeostasis, including colorectal cancer.

Work in the group utilizes gene editing methods to develop mouse models to interrogate the role of specific transcription factors and signaling pathways in development and disease. His work contributes to a better understanding of normal developmental processes and how misregulation of these events may lead to congenital birth defects including neural tube defects. In the adult, some of these pathways are also implicated in the genesis of certain cancer, and work from the Lohnes laboratory is providing new insight as to these relationships.

Scientific Breakthroughs

Over the past several years, work from the group has revealed fundamental roles for a family of transcription factors, the Cdx family, as essential regulators of events which direct normal mammalian development. In addition, studies from the Lohnes lab have shown that the Cdx transcription factors serve to both “read” and to regulate the activity of several signaling pathways that are themselves essential for normal development. These studies have not only uncovered novel fundamental processes in developmental biology, but also suggest new bases for certain congenital defects prevalent in the human population. In addition, these pathways and transcription factors play fundamental roles in several types of cancer, including colorectal cancer and some leukemias.

Accomplishments / Awards

Over the past several years, work from the group has revealed fundamental roles for a family of transcription factors, the Cdx family, as essential regulators of events which direct normal mammalian development. In addition, studies from the Lohnes lab have shown that the Cdx transcription factors serve to both “read” and to regulate the activity of several signaling pathways that are themselves essential for normal development. These studies have not only uncovered novel fundamental processes in developmental biology, but also suggest new bases for certain congenital defects prevalent in the human population. In addition, these pathways and transcription factors play fundamental roles in several types of cancer, including colorectal cancer and some leukemias.

Grant Support

Past and present research in the group has been supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the March of Dimes Research Foundation, the Canadian Cancer Society and the Cancer Research Society.

Postdoctoral Fellow Recruitment

The Lohnes laboratory focuses on understanding of the interplay between signaling pathways and transcription factors in regulating genetic networks involved in mammalian development and in the eitiology of diseases such as colorectal cancer. Our principal models are genetically engineered mice and gene-edited stem cells. Our recent work has focused on the Cdx family of transcription factors, and their interplay with important signaling pathways including the Wnt and Notch pathways. In addition, to a better understanding of the gene networks regulated Cdx in conjunction with these pathways, we are also exploring the interaction between Cdx and regulators of the eipgenome.

We are currently recruiting a Postdoctoral fellow to join the group. The ideal candidate will be highly motivated, with a strong background in mouse genetics/development, tissue culture, regulation of gene expression (including RNAseq and ChIPseq) and related techniques in cell and molecular biology. The ability to work both independently as well as in a team setting is essential.

The position is available for a period of two years, with the possibility of extension, at a salary of $45,000/year.

Interested candidates are asked to forward their CV as well as the names and contact information of three references to dlohnes@uottawa.ca.

The position will remain open until filled.

Fields of Interest

  • Vertebrate Development
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Intestinal Homeostasis
  • Genome Editing
  • Regulation of Transcription
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