Faculty of Medicine in the Media: June 2018

Hands holding newspaper

Here is a highlight of where our faculty members, learners and alumni have appeared in the news this month.

Week of June 08 - 14

Public-health experts applaud New Brunswick's decision to ban chocolate milk, fruit juice in schools (The Globe and Mail)
Dr. Yoni Freedhoff, Faculty of Medicine, comments on the elimination of sugary drinks such as chocolate milk and fruit juice from schools.

Depression still linked to higher risk of early deaths Depression is still strongly linked to higher long-term risk of early death for both women and men,a study said. (UrduPoint.com)
Dr. Ian Colman, Associate Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, comments on a study that shows that depression is strongly linked to higher long-term risk of early death for both women and men.

Canada shouldn't just be measuring 'poverty' by comparing people's incomes to hockey millionaires (Financial Post)
Dr. Michael Wolfson, Adjunct professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, argues that we should rethink the way we look at poverty.

Why we walk: Ottawa residents say why they turn out for good causes (CBC News)
Tiffany Stern and Adrian Guerra-Phalen, both working in a lab at the University of Ottawa medical campus, talk about why they walk the 2018 Walk for ALS.

Week of June 01 - 07

Six principles for assessing scientists for hiring, promotion, and tenure (British Politics and Policy at LSE)
Dr. David Moher, Associate Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, presents six principles for assessing scientists for hiring, promotion, and tenure.

Why Canada needs an official poverty line (The Globe and Mail)
Dr. Michael Wolfson, Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health, shares his thoughts on poverty in Canada.


French Media

Semaine du 1 – 7 juin

La lutte à l'obésité infantile passe par des lois selon des chercheurs (Radio-Canada)
Dr Yoni Freedhoff, Faculté de médecine, discute de la culture de la malbouffe chez les enfants.

A newspaper

 

Back to top