Jacqueline TOKAREW

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Jacqueline TOKAREW
Graduate Program: Cellular & Molecular Medicine

Master of Science, University of Ottawa (2011)
Bachelor of Science, University of Ottawa (2008); Honours

Jacqueline Tokarew

Biography

Year of Entry:  2011

PhD Supervisor:  Dr. M. Schlossmacher

Personal Background:

Born and raised in Ottawa I completed my undergraduate degree in Biopharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Ottawa. There I gained a well-rounded training in chemistry and biochemistry. Having interest in applied organic chemistry, I joined Dr. Robert Ben’s research team in 2008 and worked on understanding how naturally derived antifreeze glycoproteins function and how to modify them for use in human tissue. There I gained valuable experience in Organic Synthesis while completing my Master’s Degree. Having a father with Multiple Sclerosis I have always had an interest in neurology. Soon after being accepted into medical school I joined the Schlossmacher Lab to work on my PhD. I hope to someday lead my own research team and focus on finding a cure for MS and other debilitating neurological diseases.

Research Focus:

In the Schlossmacher Lab I am currently working on deciphering how mutations in the Parkin protein causes early-onset Parkinsonism. Here I am able to put a bit of my chemistry skills to work since we are trying to understand how thiol-based chemistry is altering Parkin’s ability to protect cells from oxidative damage. A major hurdle in Parkin research is the lack of tools, specifically antibodies for detecting this protein in human brain. My goal is therefore to: 1) better understand Parkin’s role in normal human brain and 2) develop better tools to further Parkin research.

Scholarship Support:

2015 - Awarded CIHR MD/PhD Program Grant – 2014

2015 - Audrey Grant Research Scholarship- Parkinson’s Research Consortium

2014 - Ontario Graduate Scholarship

Fields of Interest

  • Interphase Between Basic Biochemistry and Chemistry to Focus on Developing New Therapeutics for Various Neurological Diseases
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