How you can help!

people pushing a piece of a puzzle

You can help fight neuromuscular disease and make a difference through supporting innovative research and patient clinic support!

Research: You can

  1. Participate in groundbreaking basic science research, advancing our understanding of the molecular biology and disease causes of neuromuscular disorders through tissue sample donation
  2. Register in clinical therapeutic trials
  3. Enroll in neuromuscular disease registries
  4. Make a donation to support neuromuscular disease research and clinical care in Ottawa

Your support enables us to advance promising new research and treatment programs, train future generations of physicians and scientists, expand vital support services and share our knowledge with the community.

For further information, please contact cnmd@uOttawa.ca.

 

Éric Poulin Centre for Neuromuscular Disease Fund

Over 3000 Canadians are currently living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Each year, approximately 1000 Canadians die from ALS. This fund, named in honour of Dr. Poulin, was established to help support the CNMD’s mission to be an international leader in ALS research and help patients living with ALS and their families.

This fund allows us to build research capacity through expansion of infrastructure, participation in studies and trials, and the training of the next generation of ALS researchers.

Some notable recent accomplishments achieved with the support of this fund include:

  1. Hosting our first special ALS and neuromuscular clinical research days (led by Dr. Ari Breiner)
  2. Development of ribonucleic acid (RNA) silencing techniques to stop the production of ALS-causing proteins (led by Dr. Derrick Gibbings)
  3. Securing participation in an upcoming phase-3 clinical trial assessing a potential drug treatment for people with ALS
  4. Advancing our understanding of the breadth of genetic causes of ALS
  5. Support of two Scholarship in Translational Research (STaR) Awards for trainee-level scientists specifically involved with motor neuron disease or ALS-related disorders
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